Current Slang

In today’s world, social media holds a powerful influence on the new age of technology users. Tik Tok, Instagram, and Snapchat constantly invent new trends and sayings that people love to use in their lives. Students at Andover Central have integrated the latest sayings from social media into their everyday conversations. Some of the lingo used by students include sayings such as “Pushin P,” “Bussin,” “Cap,” and “Sus.”

While older generations may not understand what the new slang and words

signify, younger generations do. Andover Central students offered their insight on what the newest onslaught of sayings and slang means.

“If somebody describes a food they’re eating as ‘bussin,’ it means it tastes good,” senior Brittany Harshaw said.

Contrary to popular belief, “bussin” does not mean riding the bus to school.

Another commonly misunderstood slang is the word “cap” or “no cap.”

“The word ‘cap’ is hard to understand,” senior Skyler Jones said. “If somebody says

‘you’re capping’ it means that somebody is lying. ‘No cap’ means that somebody is

telling the truth.”

Some students thought the slang word “capping” meant somebody had stolen their pen cap.

One of the most popular slang words among students is the slang word “Pushing P.”

“When you’re ‘Pushing P’ it means you’re doing good in life. It means that somebody is a cool individual,” senior Rece Wilson said.

Pushing P, capping, and bussin are just a few slang words students say. Many other slang words are flowing around schools, such as bet: cringe, drip, and fire. Social media has given way to a whole new world of sayings that the older generation has trouble comprehending.

Teachers and parents seeking to understand what slang their students are saying can find answers using the QR code.


Pushing P - pushing the lifestyle of a player, a real one

Bussin- when something (food) tastes really good

cap- it means your lying, but in a different way

sus- a term meaning something is suspicious



16 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All